Home > Beer > Station To Station: The Booking Office, St Pancras Renaissance Hotel

Station To Station: The Booking Office, St Pancras Renaissance Hotel

If you ever go to New York I recommend having a Prohibition Punch (as modelled by Kate, below) at The Campbell Apartment in Grand Central Station. The apartment, previously the luxurious private office of John Campbell, a jazz age financier and railway tycoon, was reopened as a bar in 1999 with a suitable cocktail menu.

Our previous trip to the Campbell Apartment was one of the reasons I wanted to visit the new Booking Office bar at St Pancras. The recently-opened Renaissance St Pancras Hotel occupies part of the huge and ornate Midland Grand Hotel (1873-1935) as designed by Sir Gilbert Scott, after whom the new fine dining restaurant headed by Marcus Wareing is named.  A lot of thought has gone into recreating the glamorous history of the building, from the décor to the historic recipes in the restaurant.

The Booking Office bar, which was the old ticket office, stands between the hotel lobby and the first floor platforms from which the Eurostars run to Paris, beside Carluccio’s and The Betjeman Arms. The room itself has a hugely high ceiling. On what was a very warm summer’s day it was a nice, cool place to relax before the train back to Leeds.

We ordered a couple of cold beers to start with and had a good light lunch: a chicken and avocado sandwich for myself and salmon fishcakes for Kate. They had a number of Meantime beers on keg including their very pleasant London Pale Ale. The beer came in pewter tankards, which was a first for me. I’m not entirely sure if it added or detracted from the beer, but it definitely looked good and kept the lovely crisp pale ale cold and refreshing. 

In common with the recipes used in The Gilbert Scott, the drinks menu in The Booking Office is intended to hark back to the era of the original Midland Grand. The beers may ruin this theme slightly by being on keg rather than cask, but they are of good quality (Meantime, Harviestoun). Meantime attempts to replicate old beer styles so the method of dispense perhaps shouldn’t matter quite so much.

However where the focus lies is the cocktail and punch menu. I had a Billy Dawson Punch Rocks, a nicely boozy punch which came in a small copper mug with fruit floating in it. Kate had a nice lemony concoction made with egg white, the name of which escapes me.

Of course the bill was a bit steep, but The Booking Office is a very special place to sit for a while, soaking up a little bit of glamour and a nice punch. As railway waiting rooms go, it definitely beats the first class lounge in Kings Cross.

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  1. July 20, 2011 at 3:21 pm

    Thought I’d have a look on their website and see what ‘pricey’ means….. WORTHINGTON WHITE SHIELD £8.50 a bottle!

    Day light robbery, but hey ho, thats London!

    Does look like a great place though, would make a nice start or end to a special london trip like a weekend away.

    • July 28, 2011 at 10:22 pm

      Yeah, it’s not cheap. Hotel prices + London prices. Yikes.

  2. fabrega
    August 30, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    expensive but so good
    food is brillant

  3. Alex Forte
    September 7, 2011 at 11:58 am

    Yes, it’s ludicrously expensive but the biggest gripe is about the daft rectangular lampshades above the bar which are already grubby and also block out any view of the vaulted ceiling. The cheap metalwork makes them look like they once saw service in Lidl.

  1. July 24, 2011 at 10:06 pm

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